27 April 2011

The Racist Movement in Calgary Put in Perspective

We've been covering the growth of organized racism in Canada, with special attention being paid to Calgary, since November 2007. Actually, we've been following the movement in Canada for years, but we were prompted to start our public work not long after the Aryan Guard entered upon the scene. So we thought we would briefly discuss the state of organized racism in Calgary today.

If you are an anti-racist, there is reason for optimism, though we have to be careful not to become complacent.

If you're a member of organized racism, the outlook is looking pretty bleak.

Now, we have to contextualize this claim. On the surface, the problem of organized racism still seems to be (and is) a significant problem. There are still boneheads moving to the city (one of the most recent, "Max" was one of the more vocal of the March 19 boneheads). Paulie has decided that Calgary is the city that would be most accepting of his racially divisive platform of closing immigration to non-White peoples. And of course there was the home invasion and assault of Jason Devine and a friend this past November, which would indicate that already violent individuals had become more brazen and more violent.

While we don't discount these and recognize the serious threat that still exists, especially to vulnerable peoples who tend to be the targets of boneheads, there really are reasons to be optimistic. One reason for optimism is the pessimism of the boneheads themselves. Even they recognize their movement is failing in the city of Calgary.

Case in point, this, "call to action" from a newbie on Stormfront:


Normally this kind of first post from a newbie would result in the usual accusations of the new member being an anti or a member of the RCMP, which did occurred. However it is telling that Stormfront moderator Dan Martin (OdinPatrick) actually engaged the new member to explain why things have been going so poorly for the movement:


John Marleau, not exactly a wilting violet when it comes to advocating violence, agrees:


And as if an exclamation mark was needed to really hit home how disunified the movement is in Calgary, Rob Reitmeier can't help but get a dig in at his former friend and ally in the Aryan Guard based on one of our stories:


For lack of a better word, the high point of the movement in Calgary would have to be March 21, 2009 when between 50 and 80 boneheads showed up for the "White Pride Day" march. But it could also be considered the time when the movement went into an inevitable decline. There were already splintering as personality conflicts came to a head, resulting in a group of Aryan Guard members splitting from the original and forming their own rival, and hostile gang. The animosity that resulted led to the attempted murder of one of the rival group members and though the Aryan Guard denied involvement before, during and after Kyle McKee's imprisonment, everyone who follows these groups know the truth of what happened.

As there wasn't a March in 2010, the Aryan Guard, now renamed Blood & Honour, needed the 2011 march to be successful to remain relevant. There had been another split before the march, but that might have been dismissed if the numbers the Aryan Guard claimed would be attending from all over Canada and the United States showed up. Two other body blows occurred just before the march; the arrest and sentencing of Kyle McKee on charges related to making threats (his stint behind bars would be extended when he pleaded guilty to fleeing from the police in Saskatchewan) and the arrest of four boneheads who were promoting the March in Edmonton for assault. Even these might have been overcome if only the 100s of people they believed would be arriving were true to their word.

In the end, less than 20 boneheads showed up and they were prevented from achieving any of their goals. They failed badly and publicly. Although people like Bill Noble have tried to spin the march into a success (even likening the boneheads on March 19 to the Spartan 300 who held off the Persians), the reaction of the marchers on that day prove this is simply not true:



They weren't even able to deliver a consistent message. On the one hand, "Max" tries to convince reporters that they don't support violence and don't hate anyone, but then the dude in the Leprechaun hat makes the mistake of telling the reporters exactly what they believe (the reaction of "Max" to this is funny; one can almost hear him thinking in the first video, "Shut up!"):





We're not sure how anyone, even those who might otherwise support the views of the Aryan Guard, could look at these videos as anything but embarrassments.

From what we've been told, the bleeding has continued. Mike "Puddles" Gaio is rumored to have now disassociated himself with the Aryan Guard. We haven't been able to confirm this and it might not be true, but even the fact there are rumors such as this really shows the turmoil the Calgary movement is in.

What is the lesson that anti-racist might take from this? Their efforts have been successful, however as stated earlier we can't be complacent. Boneheads still pose a significant threat in Calgary, in some ways more so than when they were better organized.

So keep applying the pressure. We are winning.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

The fall of the movement in Calgary has nothing to do with the Anti racists. It can be solely placed on the stupidity and immaturity of call and the lack of caring he shows for his people. Drunks and drug addicts now now run Blood and Honor.

Anonymous said...

What about pre-2007? Did things just pop out of nothing at that point, or has there been a long history of racism in Calgary?