4 October 2014

National Policy Institute Conference Shut Down in Budapest: Paulie Squeals Angrily

Racist groups that try to present themselves as more than bonehead thugs like to give themselves what they consider to be respectable names. The National Policy Institute (NPI) is one such group of
boneheads in suits, though the NPI are a little more ambitious than most. For example, this month the NPI organized a conference in Budapest, Hungary. Given the growing influence of Jobbik and the increasing attacks on Roma and Jewish Hungarians, perhaps it made sense for the organizers of the event to choose the Hungarian capital. Certainly, it seems that Jobbik were happy to see the arrival of mostly American white nationalists, as well as Canada's own Paul Fromm. The Hungarian government, however, decided that they really didn't want a bunch of racist foreign nationals entering their country and banned the conference (though the racist political party Jobbik insisted the NPI wasn't racist, so there's that for an endorsement).

Considering a position of the NPI is that foreign nationals from non-European nations should not be permitted to enter Europe or North America, the director of the organization Richard Spencer grudgingly accepted the decision of the Hungarian government and, as a foreign national himself, decided to call off the conference and his own flight to the country.

Right? Because it would be pretty hypocritical if he decided that he, a foreign national, would try to enter a country where he and his group was not welcome.

Yeah, you know where this is going.

Long story short not before the conference began Hungarian police arrived and shut things down, detaining a number of the white nationalist attendees as well.

But like a greased little piggy, Paulie seemed to have slipped through the dragnet:


That Paulie is in Budapest and not campaigning for mayor in Mississauga may suggest to some cynical readers that he really isn't serious about actually winning the election and is merely interested in the elective office he is claiming to seek in so far as it boosts his appeal to his tiny base.

Not that we would ever suggest a thing ourselves.

We do wonder though what would happen if someone were to tip off Hungarian customs to Paulie's presence in their country and that he came to speak at a banned conference?

1 comment:

Enrique Cardova said...

At least the Japanese in WW2 were open about their fascism. They had a "Bureau of Thought Police." Apartheid South Africa threw in a "social service" flavour, with just the right degree of ominousness. Their secret police "enforcement" agency was BOSS (roll tape with deep, booming voice) "The Bureau of State Security."